Strange Romantic
Are there any other futuristic blogs like you that you would reccomend?

futurescope:

Hey, thanks for asking!

Most of the stuff comes from a variety of sources, so I can’t say read this and that and you’re good to go. There would be too much noise around the things you’re looking for.

(Honestly, I lost count of blogs, tumblrs, university websites and tech magazines. It’s one big stream, controlled by some amateurish filters & algorithms incl a lot of needlework.)

But a good start is the futurology subreddit, tumblrs from futurists like emergent futures, fuckyeahfutureshock or magazines like Tech Review, Wired, Technologist, Motherboard and BBC Future. And, of course, you should follow some futurists & scifi writers on twitter.

nevver:

Forget Paris

Here are a compilation of recordings made in space, recorded by either NASA or SETI. I don’t know, I just really like space and the sounds can be soothing. I hope that you will agree. +more masterposts 
+listenRecordings Of Earth: Recorded by NASA.Jupiter sound waves: This is the sound Jupiter emits via electromagnetic waves.Wow! signal: The Wow! Signal is a signal of unknown origin found by SETI. The signal surpirsed the founder so much, he wrote WOW! right on the paper.Jupiter’s radio Waves: These sounds, recorded by the Cassini space probe, are recordings of the radio waves of Jupiter. Saturn’s Radio Emissions: This audio was recorded by the Cassini spacecraft picked up in April of 2002.More Saturn’s Radio Emissions: This audio was recorded by the Cassini spacecraft picked up in April of 2002.Uranus: Voyager recording of Uranus.Mercury: These sounds were captured from an orbiting satellite from back in 1999 - 2001 I think.Pluto: Sounds of the lonely planet.Neptune: Recorded by Voyager II August 24-25, 1989.Saturn’s rings: Recorded by Voyager 2 on 25 August 1981.Sounds of the Sun: From the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) which was launched February 11, 2010.Outside the Solar System: NASA’s Voyager 1 spacecraft captured these sounds of interstellar space. November 2012
+bonusThe Sounds of Earth: The full five hours of the mixtape we sent out on both the Voyager probes.Voyager Photo Album: Images voyager took.USS Enterprise (NCC-1701-D): Engine hum for 24 hours.

Here are a compilation of recordings made in space, recorded by either NASA or SETI. I don’t know, I just really like space and the sounds can be soothing. I hope that you will agree. +more masterposts 

+listen
Recordings Of Earth: Recorded by NASA.
Jupiter sound waves: This is the sound Jupiter emits via electromagnetic waves.
Wow! signal: The Wow! Signal is a signal of unknown origin found by SETI. The signal surpirsed the founder so much, he wrote WOW! right on the paper.
Jupiter’s radio Waves: These sounds, recorded by the Cassini space probe, are recordings of the radio waves of Jupiter. 
Saturn’s Radio Emissions: This audio was recorded by the Cassini spacecraft picked up in April of 2002.
More Saturn’s Radio Emissions: This audio was recorded by the Cassini spacecraft picked up in April of 2002.
Uranus: Voyager recording of Uranus.
Mercury: These sounds were captured from an orbiting satellite from back in 1999 - 2001 I think.
Pluto: Sounds of the lonely planet.
Neptune: Recorded by Voyager II August 24-25, 1989.
Saturn’s rings: Recorded by Voyager 2 on 25 August 1981.
Sounds of the Sun: From the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) which was launched February 11, 2010.
Outside the Solar System: NASA’s Voyager 1 spacecraft captured these sounds of interstellar space. November 2012

+bonus
The Sounds of Earth: The full five hours of the mixtape we sent out on both the Voyager probes.
Voyager Photo Album: Images voyager took.
USS Enterprise (NCC-1701-D): Engine hum for 24 hours.

(via the-actual-universe)

roachpatrol:

the-real-seebs:

kayinnasaki:

Cyber harassment study reveals the unsurprising!
It still amazes me that I talk to guys who still think they get harassed just as much as women online. Like even from people who aren’t clearly and totally gross dumbasses. It kinda makes me think that, even in the best cases, it might be hard to really understand the sheer difference in frequency. You see a woman get harassed on a game and you go “Oh well I’ve been harassed” without understanding that there is seldom a session for her where that doesn’t happen or understanding what her inbox might look like…

That is a sort of stunning degree of difference.

"The data’s in! Women were lying about online harassment!”
"Aha! We knew it!" 
“Yeah, they’ve been severely underreporting how bad things are for them, turns out.”
"Wait, what?"

roachpatrol:

the-real-seebs:

kayinnasaki:

Cyber harassment study reveals the unsurprising!

It still amazes me that I talk to guys who still think they get harassed just as much as women online. Like even from people who aren’t clearly and totally gross dumbasses. It kinda makes me think that, even in the best cases, it might be hard to really understand the sheer difference in frequency. You see a woman get harassed on a game and you go “Oh well I’ve been harassed” without understanding that there is seldom a session for her where that doesn’t happen or understanding what her inbox might look like…

That is a sort of stunning degree of difference.

"The data’s in! Women were lying about online harassment!”

"Aha! We knew it!

Yeah, they’ve been severely underreporting how bad things are for them, turns out.”

"Wait, what?"

(via shitmountain)

science-junkie:

'Invisibility cloak' uses lenses to bend light
A device called the Rochester Cloak uses an array of lenses to bend light, effectively rendering what is on the other side invisible to the eye. One of the problems with the cloaking devices developed to date — and it’s a big one — is that they really only work if both the viewer and whatever is being cloaked remain still. This, of course, is not entirely practical, but a difficult problem to solve. For the first time, researchers have made a cloaking device that works multidirectionally in three dimensions — using no specialised equipment, but four standard lenses.
Read more @CNET

science-junkie:

'Invisibility cloak' uses lenses to bend light

A device called the Rochester Cloak uses an array of lenses to bend light, effectively rendering what is on the other side invisible to the eye.
One of the problems with the cloaking devices developed to date — and it’s a big one — is that they really only work if both the viewer and whatever is being cloaked remain still. This, of course, is not entirely practical, but a difficult problem to solve. For the first time, researchers have made a cloaking device that works multidirectionally in three dimensions — using no specialised equipment, but four standard lenses.

Read more @CNET

(via we-are-star-stuff)

sagansense:

That one time NASA Chief Administrator (and former astronaut) Charlie Bolden and I engaged in a discussion about space exploration, the importance of science literacy/STEM, communicating science, and persevering through adversity…

imageimage

…amidst a crowd of 400+ at Washington DC’s National Academy of Sciences Building for a special screening of the film I’ve been handling all the PR/media outreach for, "I want to be an Astronaut, which became the first film to ever achieve an “orbital premiere” 230+ miles up aboard the International Space Station to an audience of 3: members of the Expedition 38/39 astronaut crew.

image

Filmmaker David Ruck and I have been collaborating with scientists, aerospace agencies, STEM institutions, space exploration non-profits, and among others, astronauts, in screening this film around the country toward a simple but profound goal:

To tell the story of going…and remind everyone what NASA means to the world, reignite those dreams again, and explore space together.
— David Ruck (Director) and Rich Evans (Public Relations)

On the evening that this exchange between Charlie Bolden, the other panel members, and myself took place, it was July 16; a nostalgic time for celebration and reflection. This date marked the 45th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing, the American Astronautical Society’s 60th Anniversary, and preceding the showing of our film, the AAS presented their Lifetime Achievement Award to NASA/JPL’s Edward Stone, who not only serves as Professor of Physics at Cal Tech, but remains the Lead Project Scientist for the Voyager spacecraft — humanity’s furthest robotic space exploring vessels.

image

You can indulge in some other memorable highlights from the evening with David Ruck’s introduction of the film, photo sets here and here, as well as my collective overview of the event, which includes a #spaceselfie of cosmic proportions…

imagewebsite || trailer || clip || audience reactions || interview || charlie bolden

Sydney Friday 26th, & Saturday 27th of September

My first time developing colour film by hand! Much easier than you’d think.

(via pistolina)

spaceexp:

Technology is rad

spaceexp:

Technology is rad

smarterplanet:

Three decades ago, if you brought together every mobile phone subscriber in the entire world, you would barely have enough people to fill up Qualcomm Stadium.

Since then, inventions have changed the world.

Today, there are over 7 billion active mobile devices in existence. In its relatively short time here on Earth, the mobile device has, and continues to, transform our lives. Drawing from World Bank data, we visualized the rise of invention in mobile phone technology.

Continue reading…

(via sagansense)

smartgirlsattheparty:

chibird:

I think it’s harder to be nice and accepting of yourself than it is to be to others.

Both are important! 

smartgirlsattheparty:

chibird:

I think it’s harder to be nice and accepting of yourself than it is to be to others.

Both are important!