Strange Romantic
shockwavech:

 

coluring:

atomkiller97:

coluring:

tbh i love those fucked up gifs that make everyone react like “wtf”

give me an example

image

image

image

(via epic-humor)

makemusicsocial:

The good news is, the last thing he heard before he died was awesome.

makemusicsocial:

The good news is, the last thing he heard before he died was awesome.

(via wingnut-dishwasher-boy)

zerostatereflex:

Squishy Robots

"A new phase-changing material built from wax and foam developed by researchers at MIT is capable of switching between hard and soft states."

MIT researchers are trying to change the paradigm of your typical robot by mimicking organic substances. The idea is that the robot should be soft to conform to a particular environment, and interact with humans, though rigid enough to actually do a procedure. They can achieve this by applying heat at particular points to deform the object, then applying coolness to make the object rigid again. 

"Robots built from this material would be able to operate more like biological systems with applications ranging from difficult search and rescue operations, squeezing through rubble looking for survivors, to deformable surgical robots that could move through the body to reach a particular point without damaging any of the organs or vessels along the way."

The last gif is a example of bendable articulation. :D 

(via mindblowingscience)

3lectricbutt3rfly:

caelas:

saying feminism is unnecessary because you don’t feel oppressed is like saying fire extinguishers are unnecessary because your house isn’t on fire

YES. THIS.

mucholderthen:

THE ANDROMEDA GALAXY IN FAR-INFRARED AND X-RAYS Explosive stars in its interior // cooler, dusty stars forming in its many rings.

The image is a combination of observations from the European Space Agency’s Herschel Space Observatory taken in far-infrared light (seen in orange hues), and the ESA’s XMM-Newton telescope captured in X-rays (seen in blues).
Herschel provides a detailed look at the cool clouds of star birth that line the galaxy’s five concentric rings. Massive young stars are heating blankets of dust that surround them, causing them to glow in the longer-wavelength infrared light, known as far-infrared, that Herschel sees.
In contrast, XMM-Newton is capturing what happens at the end of the lives of massive stars. It shows the high-energy X-rays that come from, among other objects, supernova explosions and massive dead stars rotating around companions. These X-ray sources are clustered in the center of the galaxy, where the most massive stars tend to form.

Credit: ESA/Herschel/PACS/SPIRE/J. Fritz, U. Gent; X-ray: ESA/XMM Newton/EPIC/W. Pietsch, MPE  |||  Image and narrative via Wikimedia

mucholderthen:

THE ANDROMEDA GALAXY IN FAR-INFRARED AND X-RAYS
Explosive stars in its interior // cooler, dusty stars forming in its many rings.

The image is a combination of observations from the European Space Agency’s Herschel Space Observatory taken in far-infrared light (seen in orange hues), and the ESA’s XMM-Newton telescope captured in X-rays (seen in blues).

  • Herschel provides a detailed look at the cool clouds of star birth that line the galaxy’s five concentric rings. Massive young stars are heating blankets of dust that surround them, causing them to glow in the longer-wavelength infrared light, known as far-infrared, that Herschel sees.
  • In contrast, XMM-Newton is capturing what happens at the end of the lives of massive stars. It shows the high-energy X-rays that come from, among other objects, supernova explosions and massive dead stars rotating around companions. These X-ray sources are clustered in the center of the galaxy, where the most massive stars tend to form.

Credit: ESA/Herschel/PACS/SPIRE/J. Fritz, U. Gent; X-ray: ESA/XMM Newton/EPIC/W. Pietsch, MPE  |||  Image and narrative via Wikimedia

(via the-actual-universe)

mucholderthen:

Destination Moon: The 350-Year History of Lunar Exploration
Infographic by Karl Tate
July 16, 2014  ||  Space.com

(via sagansense)

Many people object to “wasting money in space” yet have no idea how much is actually spent on space exploration. The CSA’s budget, for instance, is less than the amount Canadians spend on Halloween candy every year, and most of it goes toward things like developing telecommunications satellites and radar systems to provide data for weather and air quality forecasts, environmental monitoring and climate change studies. Similarly, NASA’s budget is not spent in space but right here on Earth, where it’s invested in American businesses and universities, and where it also pays dividends, creating new jobs, new technologies and even whole new industries.
Chris Hadfield, An Astronaut’s Guide to Life on Earth (via femscinerd)

(via sagansense)